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Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in community-acquired pyoderma in children in South India


 Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, Rajarajeswari Medical College and Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Belliappa Pemmanda Raju,
Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, Rajarajeswari Medical College and Hospital, Kambipura, Mysore Road, Bengaluru - 560 074, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None

DOI: 10.4103/2319-7250.188425

Background: Emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections among previously healthy persons in community settings (without exposure to healthcare facilities) has been noted recently. Limited studies have been carried out from India in an exclusive pediatric population on MRSA in community-acquired pyoderma. Aims: The objective of this study was to evaluate different types of primary pyoderma in children caused by S. aureus and to determine the incidence of MRSA in community-acquired primary pyoderma in children. Materials and Methods: Children aged ≤ 16 years with pyoderma caused by S. aureus who attended camps conducted in schools around Bengaluru were inducted. They were evaluated for a variety of skin infections which were cultured and analyzed for antimicrobial susceptibilities. Swabs from the anterior nares were also collected from each patient. Results: Of the total 372 children with pyoderma caused by S. aureus studied, 232 were boys and 140 were girls. Impetigo contagiosum (47%) was the most common form of pyoderma, followed by ecthyma (19.9%) and folliculitis (18.5%). The most common site involved was face in 48.4% patients, followed by legs in 32.5% patients. MRSA was isolated in 6.5% patients. Nasal colonization with S. aureus was observed in 59.7% patients. Conclusion: MRSA in community-acquired pyoderma in children was 6.5% and nasal colonization with S. aureus was 59.7% in our study. High resistance to commonly used antimicrobials in methicillin-sensitive S. aureus was also observed. Judicious use of antimicrobials is essential to control the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance.


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    -  Nagaraju U
    -  Raju BP
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