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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 196-201

Epidemiological patterns of acne vulgaris among adolescents in North India: A cross-sectional study and brief review of literature


1 Departments of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Reena Kumari Sharma
Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Sector 12, Chandigarh - 160 012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijpd.IJPD_82_16

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Background: Acne is a common skin disorder that affects both adolescents and adults. Epidemiological data on acne are limited from developing countries. Objective: The objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence and pattern of acne vulgaris among adolescent students of Chandigarh (India), and to study the impact of acne on quality of life. Materials and Methods: Children from three schools were enrolled to investigate the demographic profile, severity and causative factors of acne and its impact on quality of life using a predesigned questionnaire and followed by examination for presence, site and severity of acne. Results: Acne was present in 72.3% of 1032 children included in this study. Mild acne was present in 81.9% students, moderate in 17.1%, and severe in 0.9%. There was a significant association of acne with stress (P = 0.001) and premenstrual flare (P = 0.000). No association was found between acne and diet, hygiene, weather, family history, and smoking. The quality of life was affected in 29% of children and was directly related to the severity of acne (P = 0.000). No difference of impact on quality of life was seen between boys and girls. Conclusions: This study presents the demographic features and clinical characteristics of acne in school children. This large-scale analysis reveals that acne is a very common dermatosis among Indian school children having a significant impact on their quality of life.


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