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ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 136-138

Clinical study of cutaneous infection in children: Changing trends


1 Department of Dermatology, Subbaiah Institute of Medical Sciences, Shivamogga, Karnataka, India
2 Department of ENT and HNS, Subbaiah Institute of Medical Sciences, Shivamogga, Karnataka, India

Date of Web Publication10-Jul-2015

Correspondence Address:
GM Sangameshwara
Department of Dermatology, Subbaiah Institute of Medical Sciences, Shivamogga - 577 201, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: Nil, Conflict of Interest: None declared.


DOI: 10.4103/2319-7250.160660

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  Abstract 


Introduction: Cutaneous infection forms an important component of all dermatological practice including children. The infection will reflect the status of health, hygiene, personal cleanliness of the community, improved health awareness and with proper cleanliness the chance of getting infection is less. Aim: This study was undertaken to know, which type of infection is common, particularly in pediatric age group and factors contributing the changing trends. Materials and Methods: After obtaining ethical committee clearance and informed consent from the patients, 100 cases below the age of 18 years, attending the outpatient Department of Dermatology were taken for the study. Results: In this study, out of 100 patients, the most common infection was fungal (57%), followed by viral (23%) and bacterial (20%) infection. Conclusion: The study will provide data for future clinical research and helps in knowing changing trend of cutaneous infections in children.

Keywords: Bacterial infection, fungal infection, viral infection


How to cite this article:
Sangameshwara G, Venkatesh U. Clinical study of cutaneous infection in children: Changing trends. Indian J Paediatr Dermatol 2015;16:136-8

How to cite this URL:
Sangameshwara G, Venkatesh U. Clinical study of cutaneous infection in children: Changing trends. Indian J Paediatr Dermatol [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Dec 6];16:136-8. Available from: http://www.ijpd.in/text.asp?2015/16/3/136/160660


  Introduction Top


The prevalence of skin infection varies from country to country. The pattern of skin disease is a consequence of poverty, malnutrition, overcrowding, poor hygiene, illiteracy and social backwardness in many parts of India. Skin infections in pediatric age group vary from country to country and within the same country, from one state to another, due to various climate, culture and socioeconomic factors and in the dermatological practice 30% of the patients were of pediatric age group.


  Materials and methods Top


Hundred children aged below 18 years, attending outpatient Department of Dermatology were included in this study. The diagnosis was made, based on detailed clinical history, general, systemic and cutaneous examination. Relevant investigations were carried out in necessary cases. The findings were recorded in proforma for analysis and interpretation of data.


  Results Top


In this study, 100 children were examined, out of which 60 were male, and 40 were female. Age and sex distribution are given in [Table 1].
Table 1: Age and sex distribution

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In this study, the most common fungal infection was in 57 patients, followed by viral infection in 23 patients and bacterial infection in 20 patients. The pattern of cutaneous infections in children is shown in [Table 2] and [Table 3].
Table 2: Pattern of cutaneous infection in children

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Table 3: Age and sex wise distribution of incidence of various infections in children

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  Discussion Top


Skin infections in pediatric age group vary from country to country and within the same country, from one state to another, due to various climate, culture and socioeconomic factors. Infants are confined to household while preschool children aged 1–5 years are exposed to neighborhood and were at environmental risks.[1]

In the study of Karthikeyan et al., the most common dermatoses encountered were infection and infestation, which were seen in 54.5% of the study population.[2]

In the present study, the most common infection encountered was fungal infection, which constitutes 57 cases, followed by viral infection 23 cases and bacterial infection 20 cases. Sayal et al., reported fungal infection was more common and it will correlates with the present study.[3]

In the present study, out of 57 cases of fungal infection, tinea versicolour constitutes 35 cases followed by tinea curies eight cases, tinea corporis seven cases, tinea capitis and candidiasis three each and tinea pedis one.

Tinea vercicolor was the common in the present study and may be because of humidity and temperature causing sweating in the coastal area.

Giam states that molluscum contagiosum was the most common viral infection followed by wart.[4] Nanda et al., however in their study they recoded high prevalence of warts compared to mollscum contagiosum.[5]

In the present study, viral infection constitutes 23 cases out of which warts was the commonest with ten cases, followed by molluscum contagiosum eight cases, which correlates with Nanda et al. study.

In one study conducted in rural Pakistan, pyoderma was the common disorder in children.[6] Negi et al., found infection and infestation constitutes 50% of the cases in Gharwal region of Uttar Pradesh and other authors[6][7][8][9][10][11] have reported occurrence of pyoderm in the range of 35.6–85.2%.

In the present study, impetigo was the most common bacterial infection with 14 cases, followed by nail fold infection (3), cellulitis (2) and folliculitis (1).


  Conclusion Top


Proper sanitation, good hygiene, improving the nutritional status and creating health awareness can prevent infection. Early diagnosis and treatment will cure the disease. Fungal infection was common because of humidity and sweating in the coastal area, which might be the cause for increase in incidence. In viral infection, the wart was the commonest followed by molluscum contagiosum and bacterial infection was less common probably because of good hygiene and awareness.



 
  References Top

1.
Balai M, Khare AK, Gupta LK, Mittal A, Kuldeep CM. Pattern of pediatric dermatoses in a tertiary care centre of South West Rajasthan. Indian J Dermatol 2012;57:275-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
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2.
Karthikeyan K, Thappa DM, Jeevankumar B. Pattern of pediatric dermatoses in a referral center in South India. Indian Pediatr 2004;41:373-7.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Sayal SK, Bal AS, Gupta CM. Pattern of skin diseases in paediatric age group and adolescents. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 1998;64:117-9.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
4.
Giam YC. Skin diseases in children in Singapore. Ann Acad Med Singapore 1988;17:569-72.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Nanda A, Al-Hasawi F, Alsaleh QA. A prospective survey of pediatric dermatology clinic patients in Kuwait: an analysis of 10,000 cases. Pediatr Dermatol 1999;16:6-11.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Porter MJ, Mack RW, Chaudhary MA. Pediatric skin disease in Pakistan. A study of three Punjab villages. Int J Dermatol 1984;23:613-6.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Park K. Preventive medicine in obstetrics, pediatrics and geriatrics. In: Park K, editor. Park’s Textbook of Preventive and Social Medicine. 17th ed. Jabalpur: Banarasidas Bhanot Publishers; 2002. p. 359-411.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Negi KS, Kandpal SD, Parsad D. Pattern of skin diseases in children in Garhwal region of Uttar Pradesh. Indian Pediatr 2001;38:77-80.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
Sharma RC, Mendirtta RC. Clinical profile of cutaneous infections and infestations in pediatric age group. Indian J Dermatol 1999;44:174-8.  Back to cited text no. 9
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10.
Bhatia V. Extent and pattern of paediatric dermatoses in rural areas of central India. Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 1997;63:22-5.  Back to cited text no. 10
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
11.
Ghosh SK, Saha DK, Roy AK. A clinico aetiological study of dermatoses in pediatric age group. Indian J Dematol 1995;40:29-31.  Back to cited text no. 11
    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2], [Table 3]



 

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Abstract
Introduction
Materials and me...
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